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PRIVATE MUSEUM of SHARKS

VIRTUAL TOUR

Courtesy of Dr. Gordon Hubbell

OCTOBER 2006

What a treat to document this educational feast, to be able to share with others.  Dr. Hubbell has perhaps the largest and best preserved collection of rare shark jaws and rare fossil shark teeth, and associated teeth, in the world.

Assorted shark jaws, a phenomenal collection:

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INTERESTING SHARK TOOTH FACTS, 

COMPARISON TEETH, DEFORMED TEETH

How big do shark teeth get?  Here is a 7-1/4" specimen that is among the largest known:

gordon47.JPG (142692 bytes)

Shapes of different species of shark teeth: Shortfin & longfin mako, great white, Six gill, tiger, blue, sand tiger, lemon, great hammerhead, spotted Wobbegong, megamouth, bigeye thresher, bull, bigeye sand tiger, and Greenland sharks

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Natural colors of fossilized shark teeth, depending on the minerals in the soil where they fossilize:

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A shark's teeth are not attached with roots into sockets.  They are only attached to the gums, and move forward as the front row teeth fall out.  By the time this shark is 25 years old, it will have shed 20,000 or more teeth:

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Fossil shark teeth from different countries:

Germany, Italy, Japan, Mariana Trench, New Caledonia, Australia, Indonesia, Malta, Morocco, France, Belgium

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Panama, Peru, Chile, Argentina:

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United States:  VA, MD, NC, CA, FL, GA, SC:

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Fossil shark teeth of Florida:

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Comparison of Teeth:  

PHOTO 1:T-Rex, elephant tusk, whale, antelope, chimpanzee, seal, bison, sloth, pig 

PHOTO 2:  Spinosaurus, Saber tooth cat, rattlesnake, bobcat, rodent, crocodile, alligator

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Top row, normal shark teeth.  Subsequent rows, various deformities:

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Other tooth deformities:

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GREAT WHITE SHARK & FOSSIL GREAT WHITE
Perfect great white shark teeth & mouth placement:

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Deformed great white shark teeth:

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Two magnificent great white shark jaws.  The smaller is from a 16 foot male caught in Key Largo.  The larger is from an 18'2" female caught near Bunbury Esperance on 7/1/91, Australia (jaw measures 32" wide x 28" tall

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1987, California, Craig Rogers was on his surfboard when it was it was bitten by a great white shark that left two teeth behind:

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ASSOCIATED GREAT WHITE SHARK JAW IN MATRIX

Dr. Hubbell found the only complete fossilized skull of a great white shark ever recovered (5 million year old Carcharodon carcharias), found in Sacaco Peru in 1988.  Note the attached vertebrae.  Photo with Dr. Hubbell (left) and Glenn (right).

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Part of an associated set of fossilized great white shark teeth also found in Sacaco Peru

gordon10.JPG (37570 bytes)

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Modern and fossil great white shark vertebrae comparison:

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Carcharocles Poseidoni, in original matrix, from Kazakhstan, the only known of its kind

gordon21.JPG (37648 bytes)

gordon22.JPG (40463 bytes)

MEGALODON SHARK & Chubutensis
Carcharocles (Carcharodon) Megalodon

Megatoothed shark grew to 60 feet long, and lived from 15 million to 2 million years ago.  Teeth grew to 7" long.  This is the most complete set of megalodon teeth every found.  These are casts made from the originals.

gordon88.jpg (48254 bytes)

gordon88a.jpg (68101 bytes)  gordon88b.jpg (72721 bytes)

Early Miocene Megtatooth Shark (Carcharocles chubutensis) found on the West bank of the Ica River, Peru in 1993

gordon18.JPG (36779 bytes)  gordon19.JPG (37621 bytes)  gordon20.JPG (37611 bytes)

EXTINCT MACKEREL SHARK

Otodus obliquus

This large Lamniform shark grew to 40 feet.  There are 146 teeth fully or nearly developed, 40 embryonic.  Most were contained in 3 pieces of matrix, the largest piece with 64 teeth.  Khourigba, Morocco.

June 2005

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gordon82.jpg (71962 bytes)

Associated teeth from this large fish-eating shark that lived 50 million years ago, it grew to 40 feet long.  

110 teeth, 34 vertebrae.  Collected in the Atlas Mountains Phosphate Pits near Khourigba, Morocco, July 2004

gordon78.jpg (73446 bytes)

This set of 95 teeth comes from a shark that lived in our oceans 50 million years ago.  These associated sets of shark teeth are extremely rare and very important to scientific study.  They are the key to a better understanding of fossil sharks and shark evolution. 

gordon79.jpg (69632 bytes)

Associated 180 Echinorhinus shark teeth, an extinct Bramble shark, from Northern Chile, the only associated set known

gordon86.jpg (84679 bytes)

Vertebrae that are associated with one of the Fossil Mackerel Shark (Moroccan Otodus obliquus) tooth sets above, still in protective plaster, under Dr. Hubbell's display table:

gordon64.JPG (37921 bytes)  gordon65.JPG (39173 bytes)

MAKO SHARK
Miocene Mako, Isurus hastalis

This large Lamniform shark grew to 28' and was the precursor to the modern Great white shark.  165 teeth in this associated set, one of the most complete ever found (near Sacaco Peru)

gordon85a.JPG (37144 bytes)  gordon85b.JPG (40621 bytes)  gordon85.JPG (36874 bytes)

OTHER WEIRD SHARKS
Megamouth Shark.  The only known set of associated teeth from this rare Miocene shark, found in Copiapo, Chile (5 million years old)

Basking Shark  - Cetorhinus maximus, 2nd largest living shark species that grows up to 30' long, eats plankton, has 1200 teeth in its jaw, caught off the coast of Mexico:

gordon94.JPG (137114 bytes)  gordon95.JPG (142834 bytes)  gordon96.JPG (134559 bytes)

Whale shark jaw

Rhincodon typus, largest living shark, up to 47 feet long, eats plankton, jaw has 5000 teeth.  This is from a 10' juvenile

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(Tiny) whale shark teeth under a magnifying glass:

gordon48.JPG (139785 bytes)

Eocene Sand Tiger associated vertebrae

Jaekelotodus trigonalis

Found in Western Kazakhstan

gordon81.JPG (39084 bytes)

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Frilled shark jaw

Chlamydoselachus anguincus

New Zealand

gordon67.jpg (50219 bytes)

Nursehound shark

Scyliorhinus stellaris

gordon100.JPG (147185 bytes)

Whiskery shark

Furgaleus macki

gordon101.JPG (144214 bytes)

 

Pencil shark

Hypogaleus hyogaensis, Australia

gordon102.JPG (135263 bytes)

Gummy shark

Mustelus antarticus, Australia

gordon103.JPG (143752 bytes)

Roughskin spurdog shark

squalus asper

gordon104.JPG (144436 bytes)

Australian Swellshark

Cephaloscyllium laticeps

gordon105.JPG (135616 bytes)

Kitefin shark

gordon106.JPG (151129 bytes)

Leopard shark

Triakis semifasciata

gordon107.JPG (147227 bytes)

Plunket shark

Centrasayminus plunketi

gordon108.JPG (133149 bytes)

Centropheass Niauvang

gordon109.JPG (133933 bytes)

Cookie cutter shark

Isistius brasiliensis

gordon110.JPG (144646 bytes)

New Zealand Lantern shark

Etmopterus baxteri

gordon111.JPG (147922 bytes)

Birdbeak dogfish shark

Deania calcea

gordon112.JPG (138967 bytes)

Cretaceous Sawshark

gordon6.jpg (68991 bytes)

Sawshark mount

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Bigeye Sand tiger

gordon24.JPG (36944 bytes)

Goblin shark jaw 

(still a favorite of Heidi's)

gordon25.JPG (37320 bytes)

gordon69.jpg (60504 bytes)

Smaltooth sand tiger shark teeth 

(Odontaspis ferox)

gordon26.JPG (38448 bytes)

Fossil blind shark teeth

 (Brachaelarus species)

gordon27.JPG (38883 bytes)

Whorl-toothed shark (Helicoprion bessonowi) found in Russia and in the Western U.S. but no other part of the jaw or shark has ever been found, so they do not know how it fits into the jaw

gordon28.JPG (37724 bytes)  gordon29.JPG (38983 bytes)  gordon53.JPG (37428 bytes)

Snaggletooth (Hemipristis serra) modern & Miocene fossil associated shark teeth.  Fossil shark grew to 16 feet, modern counterpart grows to half that length.  Fossil teeth found near Ica, Peru

gordon15.JPG (39908 bytes)  gordon16.JPG (38481 bytes)

 

Edestus Heinrichi 

300 million years old, Pennsylvania.  

This is 9 teeth in one section:

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Xenacanthus texensis shark teeth (Oklahoma)

gordon68.JPG (38884 bytes)

Crusher-toothed shark (pychodus mortoni), upper teeth

Lane County, Kansas, 90 million years old

gordon41.JPG (37356 bytes)

Cladont Shark

Cladoselache fyleri, Devonian shark, Ohio

gordon51.JPG (37659 bytes)

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Fossil shark tooth in matrix

Petalodus alleghenensis, Elkville IL

gordon62.JPG (37938 bytes)

Teeth in matrix

Petalodus species, Coleman TX, and

Paleozoic Sharks:

Symmorium sp (Indiana) and

Fossil Symmorid shark (Kentucky)

gordon60.JPG (37166 bytes)

Fossil shark tooth in matrix, 

Orodus sp. , (Indiana)

gordon61.JPG (37512 bytes)

Shark tooth in matrix. 

Ctenoptychius Species.  From the Coleman Clay pit, Coleman TX.  345 million years old.

gordon31.JPG (37651 bytes)

Crusher-toothed shark (upper teeth)

Ptychodus mortoni, Niobrara Formation, Smoky Hill Member, Upper Cretaceous (90 million years old), from Lane County, Kansas

09fl46.JPG (137374 bytes)

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Gordon completed a model of the Winghead Shark, Eusphyra blochii

This species of hammerhead shark has the widest head of any shark, equaling 50% of the length of the shark.  Found throughout the South Pacific and Indian Ocean

09fl48.JPG (122283 bytes)

Small Megamouth shark skull being prepped by Gordon

Update from Gordon 8/11/11 -I haven't done a whole lot of prep work on it. According to Jose Castro the jaw is from a male. He based this on the size of the teeth. I would guess that it is from a fairly large specimen - in the neighborhood of 15 feet total length. It was caught in the southern Philippines in March of 2009.

09fl53.JPG (138651 bytes) 

 09fl54.JPG (146980 bytes)

Cretoxyrhina mantelli, Associated fossil teeth.  This large predatory shark grew to 20+ feet.  An adult specimen, 110 teeth and a few pieces of cartilage

(Kansas) May 2006

gordon87a.JPG (37985 bytes)  gordon87.jpg (80232 bytes)

RAY, SNAPPER & other FISH JAWS & SKELETONS
Bat ray jaw

Myliobatus californium (California)

gordon75.JPG (37792 bytes)

Manta ray skeleton (wow!)

gordon76.JPG (38159 bytes)

Shark ray jaw

Rhina ancylostoma

gordon77.JPG (37303 bytes)

Barracuda skull

09fl50.JPG (144738 bytes)

Cutlass fish skull

09fl51.JPG (156451 bytes)

Alligator gar pike skull

09fl52.JPG (148150 bytes)

Cubrera Snapper

gordon42.JPG (37743 bytes)

Spotted Eagle Ray jaw

Aetobatus marinari

gordon74.JPG (38526 bytes)

 
OTHER VERTEBRAE
Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon, Miocene, 10 million)

gordon89.JPG (37378 bytes)

Fossil great white shark (5 million), 

Mackerel shark (90 million)

gordon90.JPG (38505 bytes)

 

Isurolamna bajarunasi (38 million)

Snaggletooth (10 million)

Jaekelotodus trigonalis

 (40 million)

gordon92.JPG (39198 bytes)

Comparison of 18 other modern shark vertebrae

gordon93.JPG (36364 bytes)

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